Dr. Clark on bridges and crowns

Your dentist may recommend crowning teeth to “protect” or strengthen them. Unfortunately, the very concept of crowning teeth is flawed. First, the enamel is removed from a tooth to prepare for the crown. This is permanent and serious damage! Many teeth, up to 20%, may die after being crowned and will need to be extracted.[1]

For this reason, you should only get REPLACEMENT crowns and NO NEW crowns. Your metal crowns can be changed to plastic. (Remember, no metal must be left under the crown.)

If you have many crowns, you should have them all removed as quickly as possible. But you should not spend more than two hours in the dentist's chair at any one time. That is too much stress for your body.

Bridges: change to plastic crowns, partials

Removing all metal means removing all root canals, metal fillings and crowns. Take out all bridge work or partials made of metal and never put them back in. But you may feel quite attached to the gold, so ask the dentist to give you everything she or he removes. Look at the underside. You will be glad you switched.

The top surfaces of tooth fillings are kept glossy by brushing (you swallow some of what is removed). Underneath is tarnish and foulness. Ask to see your crowns when they are removed.

If you have a large bridge, it cannot be replaced with a plastic bridge because it isn't strong enough. A large bridge must be replaced with a removable partial (FlexiteTM).[2]

After your mouth is metal and infection-free, notice whether your sinus condition, ear-ringing, enlarged neck glands, headache, enlarged spleen, bloated condition, knee pain, foot pain, hip pain, dizziness, aching bones and joints improve.

Keep a small notebook to write down these improvements. It will show you which symptoms came originally from your teeth. Symptoms often come back! So go back to your dentist, to search for a hidden infection under one or more of your teeth, or where your teeth once were! That infection can be the cause of tinnitus, TMJ, arthritis, neck pain, loss of balance, and heart attacks!

Dentures can be beautiful. Of course, plastic isn't natural, but it is the best compromise that can be made to restore your mouth. At least it isn't positively charged like metals; it can't set up an electric current nor a magnetic field in your mouth, all of which may be harmful.

Do not be swayed by arguments that plastic is not as strong as metal. You see dentures everywhere and they seem strong enough to eat with. You will be told that “noble” metals like gold and platinum and silver are OK, that they are “inert” and do not corrode or seep. Nothing could be more untrue.

You may be keeping them glossy by the constant polishing action of your toothpaste. But if you look at the underside, the view is frightful. Everything tarnishes and everything seeps. You wouldn't expect even a gold or silver coin that was dropped in a fountain 50 years ago to be intact. As metal corrodes your body absorbs it!

Footnotes

1 Compare Dental crown placement: potential risks & complications and "Complete smile makeover" permanently ruins teeth: on "side effects" of crowning or the fallacious beauty promised by conventional dentistry.

2 Note however that German toxicologist Dr. Daunderer found that many denture base materials including "Flexite supreme" led to strong allergic reactions. See Problems with dentures: Potential risks & inconveniences of false teeth (scroll to "On toxins, chemicals, plastics & allergens in dentures").

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